Post on Education, Obama’s Change.Gov.Com

If we want to improve education, effectively deal with environmental issues, create meaningful jobs, improve health care and bring peace to the world, we can stop asking ourselves, what’s going to work best for ME exclusively and start asking ourselves what’s going to work best for ALL of us?

  • What’s going to work best for ALL of us in personal terms?
  • What’s going to work best for ALL of us in terms of business?
  • What’s going to work best for ALL of us in terms of education?
  • What’s going to work best for ALL of us in terms of the environment? And what’s going to work best for ALL of us in terms of peace?

Too often selfishness is disguised as altruism in a ME first environment.

When we ask ourselves life-enhancing questions like these we become consciously engaged in creating our own reality. From the time we start school, we’re told to “Sit down, shut up and do as you’re told because I’m the teacher and I know what’s best for you!” This message is conveyed to us in both words and actions. In Catholic school, we’re told, in both words and actions, “You’re basically bad because Adam and Eve ate an apple from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil against God’s express wish.” In catechism, we were also told “You can’t trust the flesh (your body) because it will always betray you.”

Wow, can you think of anything more damaging or mind-deadening than being given messages like these when you’re young? It’s especially damaging when these “commands” are delivered with great conviction from trusted “authorities”. If we believe we’re bad and can’t trust ourselves, how are we going to be inspired to learn and how can we become anything but self-conscious, inhibited and closed? As a former public transit driver, I can tell you that many students in public education are suspicious and distrustful of people in authority, even bus drivers. On the other hand, Montessori students and home schooled kids were the most open, curious and friendly. To them, I was just another person, another source of information for a curious and open mind.

Every idea is a suggestion and if we tell ourselves we’re bad, we’ll act bad. If we think we can’t trust ourselves, we’ll dis-trust ourselves and support institutions that oppress us. The way out of this morass is to question our basic assumptions and start asking ourselves good questions. This way, we become imaginatively engaged in learning and “growing” ourselves. It might even help to redefine success. Currently, success is defined by how much money, power and privilege we posses. What if we defined success by how close we are to being who we love to be, doing what we love to do? When all we ask is, what’s going to work best for me, we psychologically disconnect from others and life becomes competitive, a matter of survival of the fittest. A belief in separation and competition attracts associated ideas like kill or be killed, eat or be eaten, predatory concepts we see dramatized in life, work and art every day.

How we define ourselves and the world around us forms our intent, which in turn, forms our reality. Until we start asking questions and stop assuming we know the answers, we will continue to recycle tired old ideas like, “build new schools” or “pay teachers more money” and children will learn, not that we shouldn’t do these things. But, why not take advantage of natural passion in education? If we truly want to support our children and help them create a more pleasing reality than ours, let’s make learning fun by teaching them how to ask questions and listen/look for answers. When we  ask ourselves, who do I love to be and what do I love to do, we throw open our minds to every possibility and that, in and of itself, is exciting. And when we begin to figure out who it is we love to be and what we love to do, we have natural passion and spontaneity on our side, inspiring us to new heights of creativity and achievement . The desire to learn is built in to who we are. All we have to do as children, adults, parents and teachers is follow our bliss, be who we love to be and do what we love to do!

Pete – http://diaryofamystic.com

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Evolution

We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience. – Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (French Monk and Philosopher)

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Response to Bill Joy on TED

How we define ourselves and the world around us forms our intent, which in turn, forms our reality. Generally speaking, if we define ourselves as human, we’ll act human; if we define ourselves as men, we’ll act like men; if we define ourselves as women, we’ll act like women. However, if we define ourselves as spiritual beings having a human experience, our options change. The world becomes different. We become different and our options expand exponentially.

Currently, our dominant world view is rooted in beliefs of separation and scarcity, which puts us in competition with each other (a process similar to separating wheat from chaff). Instead of asking what’s going to work best for me, wouldn’t it be better to ask ourselves, what’s going to work best for ALL of us? This way we acknowledge both our oneness and separation, which takes us out of competition and puts us in partnership with each other.

The full question would be: What’s going to work best for ALL of us – in personal terms, and in terms of business, education, the environment and peace. Rewriting our basic script is a lot cheaper and more effective than wringing our hands and spending massive amounts of time and money trying to make a system work that’s designed to fail. It’s like trying to put a square peg into a round hole.

aswethink

Pete, http://diaryofamystic.com

We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience. – Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

Visit The LifeSong Store where the world comes to shop for inspirational and life-changing ideas on T-shirts, sweatshirts, hats, hoodies and more. Change the world for the better with POTS! (Philosophy On T-Shirts)

No Responsibility, No Freedom.

We all want to be free to be ourselves and do what we want in life, don’t we? We want to be free of judgment and fear, criticism and condemnation. The question is, how can we be free to be and do what we want when we consistently act in ways that hurt ourselves and others? Why do we not trust ourselves and one another? The answer is simple and we know what it is; it’s our survival of the fittest, Law of the Jungle mentality. When we think we’re all separate and life is a matter of survival of the fittest, we become predators and each one of us becomes fair game for the other. It’s eat or be eaten, kill or be killed in the minds of many. By choice or out of ignorance, we create the need for oppressive government, religion and laws, external regulation and control, to protect us from ourselves. As Pogo profoundly observes: “We have met the enemy and he is us.”

The problem is not outside us, it’s inside us, in the form of beliefs. If we choose to believe we’re separate and there’s not enough to go around, we’ll see the need to “fight” for survival, and enough will never be enough. When we see ourselves as one, interdependent and separate, we’ll work together for survival. It’s all a matter of perspective! When we treat ideas about who we are and what reality is like sacred recipes in a cookbook, never questioning or challenging them, they control our behavior, not us. When we mindlessly stick to old beliefs, like old recipes, we create our reality by default, not conscious design or intention. We need to actively challenge both our personal and cultural beliefs if we’re not happy with the reality we’re experiencing.

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Seat of Power

 We are not bad, it is our ideas about who we are and what reality is that are bad.

“Trust us!” say some business and political leaders. “Greed is good, and markets free of regulation will correct themselves.” We all want freedom but freedom to do what – rape, pillage and steal? In a speech given March 23, 1775, Patrick Henry convinced the Virginia House of Burgesses to commit troops to the Revolutionary War in America’s fight for independence from England and the colonies it controlled in America. The final and most memorable phrase of Henry’s speech was, “Give me liberty, or give me death!” New Hampshire’s state motto, currently, is “Live Free or Die”. Just before my discharge from the Air Force in 1964, I had an epiphany. I realized all I wanted to do was be me! Isn’t that what we all want? Don’t we all just want to be ourselves? But, how can we be free to be ourselves and do what we want if we don’t include that same freedom for everyone?

“Okay”, you say, “but how can I give freedom to you if all you want is to steal or destroy everything I value to enrich yourself? That won’t work!”

No, it won’t, if my world view is limited and all I ask myself is, What’s going to work best for me? 

Before we ask the question, What’s going to work best for me, we need to ask, What’s going to work best for ALL of us? By including everyone and all of nature in our calculation, not only do we acknowledge our oneness with (and separation from) everything, we cover all the bases. When we ask ourselves questions like What’s going to work best for ALL of us, in personal terms, and in terms of business, education, the environment and peace?, we are giving ourselves credit for being able to find good answers to these questions, whether they originate with us or not. When we ask questions like Who do I love to be? and What do I love to do?, we become conscious shapers of both ourselves and our reality, not mindless followers of established cultural and family patterns. Nor are we simply “reacting” to life.

WE CREATE OUR OWN REALITY

During the course of everyday events we often forget the role of thoughts in the forging of our material reality. We get lost in the visible symbols, the material by-products of our imaginations, forgetting the invisible blueprints from which they, and we, emerge.

Pure energy, like money, its material equivalent, is shaped into matter and experience by thought. It can be used to lift up or smash down, to build character or destroy character, to express love or express hate, to beautify or make ugly.

The purpose, or challenge, of life is to learn how to use thought in its various forms to shape energy into a pleasing reality. The prize is a sense of satisfaction, a feeling of a job well done. And, like learning to walk or talk, it is a personal, subjective endeavor that requires creative aggression. It is a great balancing act, where one must accept falling down in the course of learning how to stand up.

Remember:

Thoughts are “things” with a reality of their own and you, an artist. With thoughts in the forms of belief, attitude, value and expectation you paint the landscape of your life. CREATE A GREAT DAY!

“Reality” starts with the interaction of consciousness and energy, thoughts and emotions. What we see with our eyes, hear with our ears, touch with our skin, taste with our tongue and smell with our nose is the energy of our thoughts and emotions after they have condensed into matter or experience. What our bodies call the “present” is the past for consciousness and energy because new thoughts and emotions are already hard at work forming the next moment of our material experience. Just as a glass mirror reflects the image of our physical body, reality reflects the nature of our beliefs. If we see something in our lives we don’t like, we’re meant to change it. Obviously, some things we can’t change. For example, once we lose a limb, unlike some species, we can’t grow it back. When we see that our policies (beliefs and behavior) cause us and others, more pain than pleasure, more harm than good, we can and should change them.

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Changing ourselves and the world for the better

“God”, or the consciousness and energy of All That Is, lives within us. Therefore, the best, least traumatic and most efficient way for us to change the world for the better is for each of us to change ourselves for the better. Otherwise, as our rich history informs us, others will take it upon themselves to do it for us and who knows what or how they’ll choose to do? Here are several ways we can change ourselves for the better:

  1.  We create our reality from what we choose to believe. For example, if we believe that all men are separate and life is a matter of survival of the fittest, we’ll create a world of fear, competition, violence and pain. If we believe that all things are both one and separate and that all life is interdependent, we’ll create a world of love, partnership, peace and pleasure. If we hate ourselves, we’ll treat ourselves and others badly. If we love ourselves, we’ll treat ourselves and others well. What we’ve done in the past is not important. What we do now and in the future is what’s important.
  2. We need to take full responsibility for creating our reality. In other words, don’t waste time blaming ourselves, our parents or society for the things we don’t like about ourselves or the world. The only reason we blame ourselves and others is because we’re not yet taking full responsibility for what we believe, for the ideas in our belief system that create our reality.
  3. We need to get clear on what works for us and what works against us. Each one of us is a unique, individualized expression of All That Is. There is no right or wrong, good or bad, there just Is. There is what works for us and what works against us, what brings us pleasure and what brings us pain.
  4. We need to take action every day! We need to ask questions, look for answers and keep a journal.  The more time we spend bemoaning the present, the less time we have to change our future. We need to take a survey of how we spend our time and energy. For example, how much time do we spend debating issues with other people to see who’s right or wrong, good or bad, smart or stupid, instead of looking for solutions that work best for all of us? How much time do we spend listening to news about the state of the world instead of doing something to change it? How much time do we spend complaining about life and making excuses for ourselves, instead of doing something constructive about the circumstances we find ourselves in? (We shouldn’t feel embarrassed about this either because cultural beliefs like “you’re basically bad, you can’t trust yourself, you’re the result of a cosmic accident”, and “genes control your looks, sex, sexual orientation, intelligence and behavior” program us to accept our fate and not question it. Ideas like these tell us we can’t change so why bother?)
  5. To start, ask questions like: Who are we? What’s reality? What’s the purpose of life? Who do I love  to be? What do I love to do? What’s going to work best for ALL of us, in personal terms, and in terms of business, education, the environment and peace? To get answers, use these questions as the title of a paper for school or for yourself. Hold these questions in your mind before falling asleep and write down any information you wake up with in the morning. Meditate on these and other questions you want answers to. Use the creative nature of All That Is to find answers and then challenge them until you feel certain the answer works for you and everyone. (See: Ask Value Questions and Listen for Intuitive Answers)
  6. Make the jump from a Value Judgment World (external value system) to a Value Fulfillment World (internal value system). The ideas we hold as beliefs serve as the building blocks for the creation of our reality. To the extent we fail to question or take responsibility for our own beliefs, we create the need for an external value system (which, in and of itself, can lead to abuse) to control our behavior for our own safety and the safety of others. In effect, we define ourselves as children who need “Big Brother” controls. To the extent we understand and apply the Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you., we eliminate the need for external control.
  7. Say, “I love myself” to yourself until you actually feel it. By going through the process of repeatedly saying to yourself, “I love myself.”, you begin to see how good you are, how much you do, and how well you do it. This process serves as an antidote to cultural messages that seek to control who you are and what you do. The more we can love ourselves, the more we can love others. The more we can appreciate ourselves, the more we can appreciate others. Let’s stop being Master Fault Finders and start becoming Masters of Appreciation!

Without taking full responsibility for creating our reality, how can we grow and how can we expect to be free?

evolution

Evolution, not Revolution

The 21st Century serves as a natural timeframe for building a dream, a vehicle for life in the New Millennium that will help transport mankind through the next 1,000 years in peace and safety.

Roger Peterson – http://diaryofamystic.com

We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience. – Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

Visit The LifeSong Store where the world comes to shop for inspirational and life-changing ideas on T-shirts, sweatshirts, hats, hoodies and more. Change the world for the better with POTS! (Philosophy On T-Shirts)

Why We Need Barack Obama

America has lost its balance, but we have an amazing, unique opportunity to restore that balance on November 4, 2008.

 If you want your children and grandchildren to inherit a world of war, elect John McCain.

 If you want to watch this planet lose its environmental and ecological balance through global warming, disruption of ecosystems, disregard for endangered species (and the list goes on), vote for John McCain.

 If you want to see a continuation of a dishonest, self-serving and criminal government, vote for John McCain.

 If you want to continue the global fight for oil, instead of embracing new and greener types of energy, vote for John McCain.

 If you want to pay for war and corporate greed with your hard-earned money, vote for John McCain.

 If you want to see more unemployment, poverty, homelessness and loss of personal freedoms, vote for John McCain.

 If, on the other hand, you want to change the above, vote for Barack Obama!

 If you think Obama’s head is in the clouds, look again; he also has two feet on the ground.

Sandra Peterson

What’s Going to Work Best for ALL of Us?

If we want to survive as a species, we must realize what we’ve done is not nearly as important as what we do now and in the future. Too often we waste time finding fault with ourselves and the world, instead of using our time to create a better self and a better world.

We are both one AND separate but many of us forget this fact and think of ourselves as separate only. As a result, we ask, what’s going to work best for me? This sets us off in different directions, which leads to conflict and the need for strong external controls.

To restore balance and self-control, we must ask ourselves, what’s going to work best for ALL of us – in personal terms, and in terms of business, education the environment and peace?

Pete, http://diaryofamystic.com

As We Think

For a more complete version of this article, read, Changing Ourselves and the World for the Better.

We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience. – Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

Visit The LifeSong Store where the world comes to shop for inspirational and life-changing ideas on T-shirts, sweatshirts, hats, hoodies and more. Change the world for the better with POTS! (Philosophy On T-Shirts)

Changing Ourselves and the World for the Better

Life is a creative journey from beginning to end. We can choose to sit behind the steering wheel and consciously direct our own journey or sit in the passenger seat, leaving fate in control.

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Turning Hysteria into Sanity

A Nation of Hysterics

by Paul Campos

Lenore Skenazy, a columnist for The New York Sun, caused quite a stir earlier this month when she wrote about letting her 9-year-old son take a subway and bus by himself across Manhattan. The boy had been begging her to allow him to test his big city commuting skills on his own, and she finally agreed, handing him a map, a subway token, some quarters, and a $20 bill.

She didn’t give him her cell phone, nor did she secretly tail him as he sallied forth across Gotham alone.

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